Hoover Dam

Hoover Dam

Holding back a tremendous force can be a daunting task.  In 1931 construction began on the Hoover Dam.

This barrier holds back the Colorado River and all of its force.  When it was completed in 1935 it was the largest concrete structure in the entire world.  It holds back 28,537,000 acre feet of water at full pool.  It is 726.4 feet tall and the parapets rise another 40 feet beyond that.  The water pressure is 45,000 pounds per square foot.

The Colorado river with all its force and desire to get around it, can’t!

Webster’s defines desire as:

1. to wish or long for; crave; want.
2. to express a wish to obtain; ask for; request: The mayor desires your presence at the next meeting.
3. a longing or craving, as for something that brings satisfaction or enjoyment: a desire for fame.
4. an expressed wish; request.
5. something desired.
6. sexual appetite or a sexual urge.

For our purposes we will defer to 1 or 3.  You have to want success badly.  You have to have a “white hot burning desire” to create the kind of success you want to create.  It has to “transcend” everything.  Researchers have found that the desire to succeed is critically tied to success.  Moreover, it actually has the capability to reduce the stresses surrounding you along the way to success.

A young man went in search of a grand old Sherpa philosopher to ask him the meaning of desire.  He found the master and asked him, “What does desire really mean?”.

The old prophet said, “Follow me!”.  They hiked up a mountain.  The youth was exhausted.  They hiked around a mountain.  Now the youth was even more tired, sore and mentally done.  Finally, they reached a crystal clear blue/green lake in the mountain pass.  The Sherpa master waded out into the lake and stuck his head in the water.  He asked the youth to come to him and look at what desire is.  The youth, tired and sore, waded into the sharply cool water to where the old man was standing and reluctantly plunged his head in.  The master reached out his hand and held the young man, underwater, until the youth fought away from him.

He lunged out of the water to gasp the precious air that was so needed.  “Why did you do that?” the young man said exasperatedly.

The old master smiled.  Looking into the eyes and soul of the youth, he said, “My child, when you want something as bad as you want to fill your lungs after a period of no air, you will master desire.”

Think of that!  How many times in your life has desire been so keen that you will fight for it with that type of intensity and desperation?  How often have you been truly under water?  I would venture to say very few if none.  Our society is breeding an entitled youth.  For you to change the tide, you personally must sacrifice all to obtain what you desire.

The great Chinese philosopher Confuscious states:

“The will to win, the desire to succeed, the urge to reach your full potential… these are the keys that will unlock the door to personal excellence.”

Napoleon Hill in his book Think and Grow Rich said it this way:

“Desire is the starting point of all achievement, not a hope, not a wish, but a keen pulsating desire that transcends everything”

Do you have a keen “pulsating” desire.  Pulsating implies that the desire is consistent and in your face until you address it.  Does your desire transcend everything?  What are you leaving in the way of your success?  What are you not sacrificing to achieve what you must achieve?  This desire has to be intense and overwhelming.

Napoleon Hill also states:

“There is one quality which one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants, and a burning desire to possess it.”

If this is the case philosophically and factually, we must develop that desire.  The key word in that sentence is “develop”.  Most desire is not white hot burning desire initially.  It is a mind taught function.  Contrary to popular belief, your mind completely controls this process.

Most of that control starts with self-suggestion.  You can self-suggest your way to almost any outcome you wish to program.  I have heard many times from different people how they have lost their desire with regard to something.  It may be a spouse losing desire for their loved one physically.  It may be the desire to get healthy or stay healthy.  It may be desire to continue working in their chosen field or company.  It may be to continue down a spiritual path you have been on for a while.

I can state emphatically, whatever you truly choose that you want to do, you can develop a strong desire to comlpete the tasks or project with a newly developed desire.

8 Steps to Creating Desire (a white hot burning desire):

1.  Determine the values that you want to be a part of your Personal Philosophy.

2.  Determine the path/person/object/project or goal that you want to obtain.

3.  Define that path clearly with stated goals both short, medium and long term.

4.  Share that path with at least 5 people close to you.

5.  Create a delayed gratification plan.  Delayed gratification is where you put off some reward or item until you reach a predetermined result.

6.  Create an affirmation that clearly states what you want to desire.

7.  At least 4 times a day, state your affirmation out loud.  This engages more of your senses than just reading it.  Self affirmation is critical to success and the road to success.  What a man/woman thinks about constantly fervently, he or she will become.

8.  Create a system to measure your results.

Some will say this is hype and bologna.  However, research shows that 95% of all our decisions are made in the subconscious mind.  The subconscious mind is also highly emotional.  Emotions can be controlled by thoughts.  We can program our emotions and thus desire.  It is of the utmost importance for you to be the entity controlling what is entering your thoughts the most.  If you don’t control that input, the culture we live in will.  What do you want entering your mind?

Take the time to “control” what you put into your mind and your mind will control the output to a large extent.

Rob Wheeler

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